Item #871 Group of 381 Issues of 'Lys Mykyta,' Ukrainian Satirical Magazine, 1950-1991. Edvard Kozak, EKO.
Group of 381 Issues of 'Lys Mykyta,' Ukrainian Satirical Magazine, 1950-1991
Group of 381 Issues of 'Lys Mykyta,' Ukrainian Satirical Magazine, 1950-1991
Group of 381 Issues of 'Lys Mykyta,' Ukrainian Satirical Magazine, 1950-1991
Group of 381 Issues of 'Lys Mykyta,' Ukrainian Satirical Magazine, 1950-1991
Group of 381 Issues of 'Lys Mykyta,' Ukrainian Satirical Magazine, 1950-1991
Group of 381 Issues of 'Lys Mykyta,' Ukrainian Satirical Magazine, 1950-1991

Group of 381 Issues of 'Lys Mykyta,' Ukrainian Satirical Magazine, 1950-1991

New York, NY and Detroit, MI: 1950. Hutsaliuk, Liuboslav (illustrator). Illustrated wrappers. Item #871

An important collection of 381 issues of the Ukrainian satirical magazine Lys Mykyta, meticulously curated and published by Edward Kozak in the United States between 1950 and 1991. This collection is particularly notable for including numerous issues from the magazine's formative years in the US, offering a rich repository for scholars and collectors alike. Each magazine issue, spanning 6-10 pages, is in Ukrainian and embellished with illustrations, reflecting the magazine's commitment to striking visual satire. The collection's physical condition is generally very good, despite evidence of use such as occasional wear to the wrappers, punched holes, and "duplicate" stamps, which attest to the historical journey and the tangible legacy of these publications.

Edward Kozak, known as EKO (1902–1992), the visionary behind Lys Mykyta, was a multifaceted artist: a painter, illustrator, caricaturist, writer-humorist, satirist, editor, and a leader within the civic realm. Originating from the village of Hirne in the Stryi district, Kozak pursued his education in the arts across Vienna, Lublin, and Lviv, ultimately studying at the Oleksa Novakivskyi Art School. His contributions to Ukrainian satirical and humorous periodicals during the pre-World War II era marked the beginning of a prolific career that would extend into the realms of book illustration and the foundational work in the development of Ukrainian comics.

Lys Mykyta emerged in 1947 within a Munich camp for displaced persons, later relocating to New York and subsequently to Detroit, where it was published from November 1, 1951. The publication's schedule evolved over the years from semi-monthly to monthly, and finally, to quarterly editions. Lys Mykyta served as more than just a magazine; it functioned as a platform with the aim of galvanizing the Ukrainian diaspora. Its mission was to unite Ukrainians worldwide by creating a shared intellectual and spiritual space.

Kozak's initial forays into the world of satirical journalism, with contributions to magazines like Zyz [Cross-Eye], Komar [Mosquito], and Nash dzvinochok [Our Little Bell], laid the groundwork for the distinctive voice and style of Lys Mykyta. Throughout its run, the magazine maintained a steadfast commitment to its editorial agenda and aesthetic vision, marked by vibrant covers, penetrating commentary, and a creative reimagining of conventional periodical formats. The integration of various artistic influences, including socialist realism, Soviet caricature, modernist photo collages, and Ukrainian folk art, contributed to a rich visual and textual discourse that resonated deeply within the Ukrainian emigre community.

This archive not only signifies Edward Kozak's substantial legacy within satirical journalism and his pioneering role in Ukrainian comic art but also encapsulates a critical period in the cultural and political dialogue of the Ukrainian diaspora throughout the latter half of the 20th century. It presents an invaluable resource for academic study, offering insights into the dynamics of cultural expression, political satire, and the preservation of national identity amidst the challenges of displacement and emigration.

An impressive compilation reflecting the anti-communist sentiment pervasive in the Ukrainian diaspora during the Cold War era, along with a visually striking counterpoint to the famous Soviet magazine Krokodil [The Crocodile.].

Price: $11,430.00

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