Item #845 [Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards
[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards
[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards
[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards
[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards
[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards
[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards
[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards
[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards

[Anti-Bolshevik and Anti-Semitic Propaganda] Group of Eight Hungarian Political Satire Postcards

Item #845

A compelling set of eight anti-Bolshevik propaganda postcards, emanating from the mid-20th century. Each postcard, measuring 10.5 x 15 cm, is a stark artifact of historical political sentiments, characterized by its vividly satirical and graphic illustrations that convey a critique of the Soviet system through anti-communist and anti-Semitic imagery.

Each postcard has a title in Hungarian that reflects the theme of the illustration on the front:

"A vörös hadvezér" translates to "The Red Military Leader."
"A népbiztos" translates to "The People's Commissar."
"Az usztikok" translates to "The Usurers."
"Az elvtársak" translates to "The Comrades."
"Szovjet rendszer" translates to "Soviet System."
"Szovjet irány és cél" translates to "Soviet Direction and Goal."
"Az ártatlanok" translates to "The Innocents."
"Szovjet paradicsom" translates to "Soviet Paradise."

This collection is a poignant example of how political propaganda can intersect with racial and ethnic prejudices. The illustrations on these postcards reflect not only anti-Bolshevik views but also contain disturbing anti-Semitic caricatures, which were unfortunately common in propagandist materials of the era. They represent the dual nature of such propaganda—aimed at discrediting a political ideology while simultaneously perpetuating harmful stereotypes about Jewish people.

The address side of each card is marked with the publisher's information, "Antibolshevista levelezőlap-sorozat," a Budapest street address, pricing details, and the legal attribution "Minden jog fenntartva Felelős kiadó Dr. Ágh László.

These postcards serve as a reminder of the pernicious nature of propaganda and its role in shaping public opinion and social attitudes. They are a chilling testament to the anti-Semitic and anti-communist rhetoric that pervaded during this tumultuous period in history.

An important group for historians, educators, and collectors who seek to understand and teach the complexities of early 20th-century European political movements, the role of propaganda in these movements, and the intersection of political and racial prejudices.

* Please be aware that these postcards are being sold as historical artifacts. The contents and imagery reflect the biases and ideologies of the time and are presented for their educational and historical value, not for the offensive views they propagate.

Price: $2,000.00