Item #569 The Art of Soviet Russia. Christian Frederick Brinton, 1870–1942.
The Art of Soviet Russia
The Art of Soviet Russia

The Art of Soviet Russia

Philadelphia: American Russian Institute, 1936. Publisher's illustrated wrappers. Good condition. Item #569

Book measures: 18.5 x 24.5 cm. [20] pages: illustrations. Text in English. A copy with light wear to the wrappers and a chipped spine. Internally, the book is in very good condition.

With the foreword by Fiske Kimball, this catalog showcases the Soviet Art Exhibition, featuring creations by artists such as Aleksandr Shevchenko, Aristarkh Lentulov, Aleksandr Deyneka, Georgi Etcheistov, Vladimir Favorsky, Dmitry Kardovsky, Nina Kashina, Nikolai Kupriyanov, among other notable Russian and Ukrainian artists.

Christian Frederick Brinton (1870-1942), the youngest child of a Quaker family from Chester County, Pennsylvania, had strong ties to his family's heritage and land. He attended Haverford College, rooming with Maxfield Parrish and becoming known for his flair for theatrical antics. A 1898 European trip inspired him to pursue a career in art rather than theater. Brinton studied in Heidelberg and Paris, where he made influential connections and gained renown as an art critic. This led to his work as an organizer of art exhibitions, a lecturer, and a writer for various art publications. He resided at the Players’ Club in New York during winters and spent summers at his family's West Chester home, the Homestead. Brinton, briefly married to artist Caroline Peart, expanded the quarry master’s house at Brinton’s Quarry in 1921, creating Quarry House, his permanent residence. In 1931, he played a pivotal role in forming the Chester County Art Association, serving as its president until 1941. Brinton's extensive travels included visits to Scandinavia and Russia, and he was instrumental in introducing foreign artists to the United States. He was also involved with the American Russian Institute in Philadelphia. In 1941, he donated his art collection and library to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Price: $150.00