Kobzar. Taras Shevchenko.
Kobzar
Kobzar
Kobzar
Kobzar

Kobzar

St. Petersburg: Book printing Schmidt, 1908. Second (edited by V. Domanitsky). Publisher's cloth. Good. Item #183

Octavo (15 x 22 cm). 634 pages: portrait. Publisher's blue cloth with black ornament and lettering to spine and gilt lettering to front cover; small clean tears to half-title and title; wear to cover; slightly worn hinges; the first and the last ten pages are almost detached from the rest of binding; very lightly rubbed and soiled; owner inscriptions to title; owner red and blue stamps "Archbishop Vladimir V. Alexandrof, Russian Orthodox Church..." to half-title.

The first full-length edition of Kobzar in Russia was at the same time the most definite in the text and corresponded to the most rigorous chronological order of Shevchenko's works. V. Domanitsky verified the Kobzar's text with Shevchenko's handwritten manuscripts, which were preserved, and also used special literature on the history of the text.

Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861) a Ukrainian poet, writer, artist, public and political figure, as well as folklorist and ethnographer. His literary heritage is regarded to be the foundation of modern Ukrainian literature and, to a large extent, the modern Ukrainian language. Shevchenko is also known for many masterpieces as a painter and an illustrator. He was a member of the Sts Cyril and Methodius Brotherhood and an academician of the Imperial Academy of Arts. In 1847 Shevchenko was politically convicted for writing in the Ukrainian language, promoting the independence of Ukraine and ridiculing the members of the Russian Imperial House.

Vasyl Domanytsky (1877-1910) - a historian, literary scholar, publicist, popularizer, public and political figure; brother of Viktor Domanytsky. He worked for various journals: Kievskaia starina (as editor's secretary for many years), Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk, Zapysky Naukovoho tovarystva im. Shevchenka. He was one of the founders and the acting editor of Vik publishing house. He was a member of the Society of Ukrainian Progressives. Having studied under Volodymyr Antonovych, Domanytsky conducted archeological expeditions in the Zvenyhorodka region. He wrote several books: Kozachchyna na perelomi 16-17 st. (Cossackdom at the Turn of the 16th Century), Pisnia pro Nechaia (The Song about Nechai), Baliada pro bondarivnu (The Ballad about the Cooper's Daughter), Pioner ukraïns'koï etnohrafiï Z. Dolenga-Khodakovs'kyi (The Pioneer of Ukrainian Ethnography Z. Dołęga-Chodakowski), Krytychnyi rozhliad nad tekstom ‘Kobzaria’ (A Critical Examination of the Text of Kobzar, 1907), Avtorstvo M. Vovchka (The Authorship of M. Vovchok, 1908; a refutation of Panteleimon Kulish's rejection of Marko Vovchok's authorship of Narodni opovidannia [Folk Stories]). Domanytsky was the editor of the first complete edition of Taras Shevchenko's Kobzar (1907). He edited Ridna sprava – Dums’ki visti, the paper of the Ukrainian faction in the Second Russian State Duma. His numerous articles on political and community topics appeared in Hromads’ka dumka, Rada (Kyiv), the monthly Nova hromada, and other periodicals. He wrote some popular brochures about Galicia and Bukovyna and edited the popular Istoriia Ukraïny (History of Ukraine) by Mykola Arkas. He was one of the first organizers of a consumers' co-operative in the Kyiv region and author of popular pamphlets on questions connected with the co-operatives, among them Tovarys'ki kramnytsi (Society Stores, 1904), Pro sil's'ku kooperatsiiu (On Village Co-operatives, 1904), and Iak khaziainuiut' seliany v chuzhykh kraiakh (How Peasants Prosper in Other Countries, 1908). For his public work he was exiled to the far north. Eventually, his sentence was changed to three-year's exile outside the country. (Encyclopedia of Ukraine, vol. 1, 1984)

Archpriest Vladimir Alexandrov (1870-1945) - was an early priest to the Russian Orthodox mission in North America. He was one of the first priests to visit Western Canada, and travelled extensively around the western United States, particularly to Montana. His life was filled with scandal and controversy, especially through his tenure at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Chicago (which created the schism that led to the founding of St. George Cathedral there), the family scandal that marred his tenure at Holy Trinity Cathedral in San Francisco, his return to Russia and embrace of the Soviet backed Living Church, lawsuits in Seattle he filed over church property, as well as his eventual departure from the Orthodox Church into the Roman Catholic Church.

Price: $700.00

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